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Posts Tagged ‘dim sum’


Shu mai is a main staple of yum cha, and is found outside of the traditional yum cha setting. It is very popular here in Japan as well, and you can purchase fresh or frozen shu mai at the grocery.
Shu mai are pork and mushroom dumplings steamed in a flour wrapper and topped with fish roe or carrot. Savory and juicy, these shu mai also had pieces of shrimp inside.

Maxim’s @ Hong Kong

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A slightly different variation from the leaf wrapped rice dumpling, like the zong zi, lo mai gai is a sticky rice dumpling filled with savory chicken and wrapped in a lotus leaf before steaming. The steaming cause the aroma of the lotus leaf to be infused into the rice, and adds an extra component to the flavor of the lo mai gai. I am not a huge fan of lo mai gai, because I tend to get overwhelmed by the sticky rice, it is a nice alternative to the majority of fried dim sum dishes.

Maxim’s @ Hong Kong

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There are several steamed dumplings you can find at dim sum restaurants all using a translucent wrapper made of a combination of wheat starch and tapioca starch. Fun Guo is a dumpling usually filled with pork and chopped chives, as well as other vegetables. I love this type of dumpling skin, because it is chewy and really absorbs the flavor of it’s filling.

Maxim’s @ Hong Kong

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Sin Jyut Gyun are steamed rolls made with tofu skin, filled with pork and bamboo shoots. They are very juicy and tender, and are a nice break from fried dim sum.

Maxim’s @ Hong Kong

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I love ham sui gok so much! When I go to dim sum, the first thing I think about ordering is ham sui gok. They are fabulous dumplings made by deep frying a chewy, sticky mochi ball filled with a savory pork and mushroom filling. The deep frying makes the skin of the dumpling very crispy, and the chewiness of the mochi goes very well with the salty pork. If you order these, try and get them fresh, as they become slightly soggy and overly oily feeling after they get cold.

Maxim’s @ Hong Kong

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Zha Liang is wide rice noodles wrapped around yeo tiao (fried bread) stuffed with shrimp, then topped with hoisin sauce and sesame seeds. It is at once chewy and crispy, with bits of green onion adding to the light flavor.

Maxim’s @ Hong Kong

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Welcome to a week of dim sum food here at Yum Honey! I recently went to Hong Kong, the home of dim sum, and want to share some of my favorite dishes with you all.

Wu Gok is one of my favorite things to order at dim sum. The crispy, tender dumplings are made by boiling and mashing purple taro root, and then filling each dumpling with a mixture of pork and mushrooms. The wu gok are then deep fried until light and fluffy. Something about biting through the crunchy outside followed by the savory filling is just delicious.

Maxim’s @ Hong Kong

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